Press

Check out the latest stories in which my work is featured.

We Were Seeds

Spring In Bloom

Mar 21, 2021

Jana Robison's entry in "Flower Power" -- titled "We Were Seeds" -- was inspired by the quote "They tried to bury us, but they didn't know we were seeds," by the Greek poet Dinos Christianopoulos.

"The quote itself is a metaphor for the cause and effect relations of the oppressed and oppressors," she says. "Like seeds, the oppressed will simply rise up when [buried]. In other words, the activism of the oppressed cannot be repressed, because the more they are attacked, the more they will just continue to spring back up again."

Lost & Found

Coffee, Beer And Virtual Art: Brews reopens, but art show remains online for now

May 30, 2020

I gather inspiration from countless visual sources, ranging from movies, artists and travel to toys, advertisements and fashion catalogs. When I was young, I remember being enthralled by the tight composition, curvilinear shapes and bold coloring in the works of Thomas Hart Benton, qualities which have greatly influenced my work to this day. I was also mystified by the Spanish surrealist painter, Remedios Varo, whose narrative, dreamlike imagery was unlike anything I had been exposed to before. She had created what I wished I had dared to draw myself. Presently, I find myself most drawn to my fellow pop surrealists. Pop surrealism nods to pop culture, has a whimsical and playful nature, and often combines humor and the bizarre.

SNAKES.jpg

3X3 THREE MINUTES, THREE QUESTIONS WITH EDWARD AND JANA ROBISON

June 30, 2017

“Art matters, especially during times of uncertainty,” Jana Robison says. “I think many of us feel anxious about the future and need to express that through our art forms. We, also, need to see hope and our connectedness expressed in art, music, film, etc. I feel art will help us to overcome the obstacles ahead.”

IMG_2835.JPG

WHIMSY IN A NEW MEDIUM

May 12, 2017

"Everyone in Janalee Robison's family makes art, and it's probably accurate to say hers is the most traditional -- or was...."